English translation of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's "Mächtiges Überraschen"

translated by Rolf-Peter Wille



Goethe: Rapids of the River Reuss 
 [Goethezeitportal]


                      Mighty Surprise

From cloud enshrouded rocks a river gushes
Bound for the ocean’s fatherly embraces;
What yet may shimmer up from space to spaces,
Into the valley ceaselessly it rushes.
But demon-like quite suddenly there crashes—
Woods follow her and whirling mountain faces—
Down Óreas to find a realm of graces,
Hems in the basin, stems the mighty flushes.
The billow foams, and bends away, astounded,
And swells uphill, of its own selfhood drinking;
Dammed up is now all to-the-Father striving.
It sways and calms, into a lake rebounded;
While night stars, mirrored back, behold the blinking
Of breakers on the rocks—new life arriving.
(tr. by  Rolf-Peter Wille)



Goethe (Switzerland, 1775) 
 [Goethezeitportal]





                                                   A Sonnet Crushed by Rocks

by  Rolf-Peter Wille

Oreas is a (pseudo-Greek) mountain nymph. She makes another very short appearance in Faust 2 calling out from a natural rock to Mephistopheles: "Up here! My mountain ridge is old, / Arises in primeval mold." In Mighty Surprise the mountain nymph stands for a rockslide which stems the flow of the river turning it into a lake.


Goethe (Switzerland, 1775) [Goethezeitportal]


A real catastrophe in the Swiss Alps, the Goldau Rockslide (or Landslide), 1806, inspired Goethe. The Zürcher Zeitung described it thus: "Noises, crashing, cracking fill the air with deep roaring thunder: Whole stretches of soil torn away – pieces of rock, large and even larger than houses – whole rows of fir trees, standing upright and floating, are being flung through the thickened air at the speed of an arrow. Our paradise is transformed into hundreds and hundreds of wild death hills." A 10 meter high tsunami followed and the village of Goldau ceased to exist.


Goethe: Mount Etna

Goethe, who had visited the area in 1775, was shaken. The second quatrain [strophe] of his sonnet, the "mountain and woods in whirlwinds", seems to echo the newspaper report. Yet, Mighty Surprise is not about the transformation of a paradise into wild death hills, but about the transformation of a river into a lake. Oreas, as a counter force to the gushing river, is the catalyst of this surprising metamorphosis.


Goethe: Rhine Falls

The images in the last tercet [the last three lines of the sonnet] strangely mirror the first quatrain [the first four lines]: the river is now a lake, the cloud enshrouded rocks are lapped by breakers, the gushing water now sways and stays. While the river rushed forward regardless of anything that may mirror up, the stars are now reflected from the much calmer lake.



Goethe (lake)

A sonnet writer, or "sonnetist", knows that such a "strange mirroring", or transformation, lies in the nature of the Italian sonnet. A "resolution" to the opening "argument" of the quatrains is usually offered by the concluding tercets. The "argument" here is the clash of the first "river quatrain" with the second "rockslide" one being resolved by the "lake" tercets. In other words: this cataclysmic natural event seems perfectly suited to be expressed through the sonnet form and Goethe does it with verve. His verve, in fact, is as much counterpoint to the form as Oreas is to the river.


Goethe: Mountain Landscape With Rapids

But was not Goethe a sonnet hater? In 1800, perhaps as a reaction to a sonnet mania, Goethe wrote that he might like to write sonnets himself but would not feel comfortable with the artificial rhyme scheme:
"Thus might I like in stylish sonnets yet
With pride of effort eloquently put
In rhyme all things that—to my sense—are true.
Just how to lie with comfort in this bed?
Else do I love to carve whole blocks of wood,
Now should from time to time depend on glue."
(tr. RPW)
["Ich schneide sonst so gern aus ganzem Holze, / Und müßte nun doch auch mitunter leimen."]. Ironically these lines are from a sonnet—Goethe’s very first one (I am too lazy to translate the opening quatrains). A few years later Goethe wrote another sonnet about sonnet writing, pitting the "doubters" against the "lovers". It begins thus: "Ihr liebt, und schreibt Sonette! Weh der Grille!" Here is my translation of the opening quatrain:
"Sonnets you love and write! Woe to the whimsy!
The heart, with all its gift for revelation,
Shall ponder rhymes and their affiliation;
Oh children, trust in me, that aim is flimsy."
(tr. RPW)
The "doubters" conclude thus (as translated by John Whaley):
"Why torture then yourselves and us who read you
To push the stone uphill in steps so tiring
Whilst back it rolls and makes the struggle harder?"
to which the sonnet lovers reply:
"Our way is right, so don’t let that mislead you!
To melt the hardest stuff needs only firing
By all-consuming love’s commanding ardour."
(tr. John Whaley)
In Mighty Surprise that "hardest stuff", ironically appears to be the gushing river and it is dammed up by the energy of the rockslide. For the sonnetist, though, the "hardest stuff" is the sonnet form itself and here it is not only animated by Goethe’s powerful images of nature, but the rhetorical contortions of the second quatrain almost destroy it. Here is the "content" in "normal" prose: "But suddenly [nymph] Oreas crashes down like a demon in order to find comfort there. She is followed by mountains and woods in a whirlwind. As a result the flow is dammed up and the wide basin hemmed in."

This, now, is Goethe [in my translation]:
"But demon-like quite suddenly there crashes—
Woods follow her and whirling mountain faces—
Down Óreas to find a realm of graces,
Hems in the basin, stems the mighty flushes."
"Demon-like" is willfully pushed forward to the beginning of the sentence. But far more intrusive is the insertion "Woods follow her and whirling mountain faces", which radically cuts the main sentence into two halves. "But demon-like quite suddenly there crashes / down Oreas" would be an enjambment [running over from one verse line to the next]. With the inserted line cutting right into it, we now have to endure a suspended enjambment. I doubt that anyone could understand the quatrain on first reading.

Yet, Goethe is not interested in readability here, but enjoys expressing the radical transformation of landscape through radical language—not through description and "poetic" adjectives, but by twisting the language itself. More descriptive, in fact, is the first quatrain: "From cloud enshrouded rocks a river gushes" has a steady rhythm [more steady and majestic is the original German: "Ein Strom entrauscht umwölktem Felsensaale"] and rather regular stresses. Conrad Ferdinand Meyer’s Roman Fountain by comparison begins with far stronger rhythmic energy: "Up springs the spout and falling fills / to brim the marble basin’s round".


Goethe: Most Secret Residence

After the "cataclysmic" second quatrain, we would expect a calmer rhythm in the description of the lake. At first, though, the billow reacts, bends away astounded and swells uphill. The action or argument in a sonnet often "turns" around in its 9th verse line. This is called "volta", or "turn", and here the wave, or billow, turns quite literally:
"The billow foams, and bends away, astounded,
And swells uphill, of its own selfhood drinking;
Dammed up is now all to-the-Father ["father" = ocean] striving."
Goethe achieves the "swelling" through accumulation: "Die Welle sprüht, und staunt zurück und weichet, / Und schwillt bergan [polysyndeton: and, and, and].

Calmer now appears the final tercet. Stars, after all, are mirrored back and, apparently have enough leisure to behold the blinking of breakers on rocks. Here are the last two lines:
"While night stars, mirrored back, behold the blinking
Of breakers on the rocks—new life arriving." 
This does not sound calm at all. We still have an insertion and an enjambment and a separate conclusion—small aftershocks, perhaps. Thus each strophe has its own characteristic rhythm: the first one majestically flowing, impulsive and chaotic the second quatrain, dammed up and accumulated the third strophe and the final tercet rippling.


Goethe: Landscape With Clouds

Mächtiges Überraschen was written shortly after the Goldau Rockslide, in 1806 or perhaps in 1807. The title has been translated as follows: "Mighty Surprise", "Surprised by Might", "Immense Astonishment", "Unexpected Overwhelming". It was published in 1827 as the first number of a cycle containing 17 sonnets. The cycle’s motto is: "Liebe will ich liebend loben, / Jede Form, sie kommt von oben" [my translation: "Love I seek to laud with love, / Ev’ry form comes from above"].

_____


Here is the original German:




            Mächtiges Überraschen


Ein Strom entrauscht umwölktem Felsensaale,
Dem Ocean sich eilig zu verbinden;
Was auch sich spiegeln mag von Grund zu Gründen,
Er wandelt unaufhaltsam fort zu Thale.

Dämonisch aber stürzt mit einem Male –
Ihr folgen Berg und Wald in Wirbelwinden –
Sich Oreas, Behagen dort zu finden,
Und hemmt den Lauf, begränzt die weite Schale.

Die Welle sprüht, und staunt zurück und weichet,
Und schwillt bergan, sich immer selbst zu trinken;
Gehemmt ist nun zum Vater hin das Streben.

Sie schwankt und ruht, zum See zurückgedeichet;
Gestirne, spiegelnd sich, beschaun das Blinken
Des Wellenschlags am Fels, ein neues Leben.




Rhythmus und Ausdruck im Goethe Sonett "Mächtiges Überraschen"


von Rolf-Peter Wille




Lebendmaske 
von Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1807


              Mächtiges Überraschen
Ein Strom entrauscht umwölktem Felsensaale,
Dem Ozean sich eilig zu verbinden;
Was auch sich spiegeln mag von Grund zu Gründen,
Er wandelt unaufhaltsam fort zu Tale.
Dämonisch aber stürzt mit einem Male –
Ihr folgen Berg und Wald in Wirbelwinden –
Sich Oreas, Behagen dort zu finden.
Und hemmt den Lauf, begrenzt die weite Schale.
Die Welle sprüht, und staunt zurück und weichet,
Und schwillt bergan, sich immer selbst zu trinken;
Gehemmt ist nun zum Vater hin das Streben.
Sie schwankt und ruht, zum See zurückgedeichet;
Gestirne, spiegelnd sich, beschaun das Blinken
Des Wellenschlags am Fels, ein neues Leben.

(Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1807)

(English translation here)


So also klingt das Sonett eines Sonett Verächters? Schrieb nicht einst Goethe, er reimte selbst in künstlichen Sonetten; nur wüsste er sich hier nicht bequem zu betten? Sonst nämlich schnitte er gern aus ganzem Holze, müsste aber im Sonett doch auch mitunter leimen. Goethe allerdings – ironisch wie immer – schrieb’s in einem Sonett. Im Vers schaut es nämlich so aus:
So möcht ich selbst in künstlichen Sonetten,
In sprachgewandter Mühe kühnem Stolze,
Das Beste, was Gefühl mir gäbe, reimen;
Nur weiß ich hier mich nicht bequem zu betten.
Ich schneide sonst so gern aus ganzem Holze,
Und müßte nun doch auch mitunter leimen.
Ihm antwortete daraufhin der Dichter und Sonettist August Graf von Platen:
Wem Kraft und Fülle tief im Busen keimen,
Das Wort beherrscht er mit gerechtem Stolze,
Bewegt sich leicht, wenn auch in schweren Reimen.
Er schneidet sich des Liedes flücht'ge Bolze
Gewandt und sicher, ohne je zu leimen,
Und was er fertigt, ist aus ganzem Holze.
Wenn es auch eine Hassliebe gewesen sein mag, Goethe verliebte sich in’s Sonett:
Nun aber folgt die Strafe dem Verächter,
Als wenn die Schlangenfackel der Erinnen
Von Berg zu Tal, von Land zu Meer ihn triebe.
Ich höre wohl der Genien Gelächter;
Doch trennet mich von jeglichem Besinnen
Sonettenwut und Raserei der Liebe.
[Goethe: Nemesis]
Und 18o7 entstand ein Sonettzyklus von 17 Sonetten. Mächtiges Überraschen ist das erste Gedicht des Zyklus’. Beim Lesen der ersten Strophe spürt man unmittelbar, dass sie "aus ganzem Holze" geschnitten ist:
Ein Strom entrauscht umwölktem Felsensaale,
Dem Ozean sich eilig zu verbinden;
Was auch sich spiegeln mag von Grund zu Gründen,
Es wandelt unaufhaltsam fort zu Tale.
Mächtig, majestätisch strömt die erste Verszeile, ihre Wörter verlängern sich allmählich von "Strom" [eine Silbe] bis "Felsensaale" [vier Silben], und gleichmäßig verteilt sind ihre Betonungen: "Ein Strom entrauscht umwölktem Felsensaale". Viel schroffer und energischer, zum Beispiel, beginnt der Römische Brunnen von Conrad Ferdinand Meyer: "Aufsteigt der Strahl und fallend gießt [/ er voll der Marmorschale Rund]". Bei Meyer ist die Wortfolge, oder Wortstellung, umgedreht [Hyperbaton, Satzumbau]; es "sollte" heißen: "Der Strahl springt auf und gießt fallend." Bei Goethe entspricht die Wortfolge einem "gewöhnlichen" Prosasatz.

Im Nebensatz bereits, in der zweiten Zeile also, ist aber das Dativobjekt, "dem Ozean", an den Anfang gerückt; normal wäre: "[um] sich eilig [mit] dem Ozean zu verbinden". Die Verkürzung – ohne Konjunktion "um", ohne Präposition "mit" – unterstreicht auch das Eilige hier. Nur drei Hauptbetonungen gibt es, O - ei - i, und so fließt’s rascher mit einem Male. Auch kürzer schaut die zweite Zeile aus. Ihre Silbenzahl gleicht der ersten [jede Zeile des Sonetts hat genau elf Silben], aber ihre Silben haben sehr viel weniger Konsonanten:
Ein Strom ent-rauscht um-wölk-tem Fel-sen-saa - le,
Dem  O -  ze    -  an  sich   ei  -  lig   zu  ver-bin-den;
Sehr farbig und dynamisch moduliert erscheint die Vokalfolge der ersten beiden Zeilen. So erhellen sich allmählich die betonten Vokale der ersten, o-au-ö-e-aa, und mit einiger Einbildungskraft mag man beim Sprechen einen Strom hören, welcher der sonoren Akustik eines Felsensaales entrauscht.
Ein Strom entrauscht umwölktem Felsensaale 
Der beeindruckende Ausdrucksreichtum Goethes aber zeigt sich in den unscheinbaren Vorsilben "ent-", "um-" und "ver-", denn sie sind’s, die hier eigentliche Bewegung in’s Bild tragen. Ein Spielkalb mag sie, zum Spaß, verdrehen:
Ein Strom umrauscht entwölkten Felsensaale
Wie hat sich doch nun das Bild verändert! Oder vielleicht:
Ein Strom verrauscht im Felsensaale;
Den Ozean wollt er entbinden.
[Doch konnte er ihn nirgends finden;
Nun plätschert er als See im Tale.]
Auch Meyer, übrigens, hat die richtungsgebenden Vorsilben sehr wirksam eingesetzt:
Aufsteigt der Strahl und fallend gießt
Er voll der Marmorschale Rund,
Die, sich verschleiernd, überfließt
In einer zweiten Schale Grund.
Hier, zum Spaß wieder, eine "Vermeyerung" Goethes":
Aufrauscht der Strom und eilend fließt
Er fort zum Ozeane hin.
Hier nochmals der reine Goethe, weder vermeyert noch williert:
Ein Strom entrauscht umwölktem Felsensaale,
Dem Ozean sich eilig zu verbinden;
Um den gewaltigen Unterschied im Charakter wahrzunehmen, lohnt es sich, diese beiden Versionen laut vor sich hin zu deklamieren. Ungeduld dort – Würde hier. Durch das Vorrücken von "dem Ozean" [Hyperbaton] zielt das Strömen auf die erste Silbe von "Ozean". Strom und Ozean, als jeweiliger Anfang der Zeile, "verbinden" sich bereits im Vers; freilich auch durch den Anklang [Assonanz] "o /o".
Ein Strom entrauscht umwölktem Felsensaale,
Dem  Ozean sich eilig zu verbinden;


Goethe: Rheinfall
Umgedreht ist in den nächsten beiden Zeilen nun die Folge von Haupt- und Nebensatz – nämlich zuerst steht der Nebensatz:
Was auch sich spiegeln mag von Grund zu Gründen,
Er wandelt unaufhaltsam fort zu Tale.
Der Satzbau des Nebensatzes ist leicht verdreht. Normal wäre: "Was sich auch von Grund zu Gründen spiegeln mag". "Was sich" klänge aber hart durch das Aufeinanderzischen der beiden "s" Laute. "Gründen" ist ein Reimwort und wohl auch daher nach hinten geschoben. Aber es gibt bessere, rhythmische, Gründe für die Umdrehung der Wortstellung. In der Goetheschen, rhetorischen, Form erzeugt der Nebensatz mehr Spannung. "Was auch sich" schafft mehr Erwartung als "Was sich auch". Man vergleiche Folgendes:
Die Haare sind bei mir sehr ungekämmt,
Was sich wohl auch im Spiegel zeigen mag.
Was auch sich spiegeln mag im Badezimmer,
Die Haare werd ich mir nicht kämmen!
"Von Grund zu Gründen" am Zeilenende dann spannt sich wie ein Flitzebogen und die vierte Zeile schießt nun, ein Pfeil in slow motion, unaufhaltsam fort auf das Wort "Tale". Freilich: "Grund" spiegelt sich auch in seinem Plural Gründen [Polyptoton]. (Und so spiegelt sich "sich spiegeln" in "von Grund zu Gründen").

Die "Unaufhaltsamkeit" der letzten Zeile steckt übrigens bereits im [trochäischen] Wort "unaufhaltsam", wenn man seine Silben gleichmäßig betont. Zum Vergleich: Er wandelt nun unweigerlich zu Tale. Das jambische "unweigerlich" erzeugt eine ganz andere Wirkung hier. "Er wandelt unaufhaltsam fort zu Tale" mit seinen vielen A-Vokalen [Assonanz] klingt manisch. Mein Bild vom "Pfeil" ist falsch. Der Satz ist eine Walze, ein Juggernaut, der sogar über seine eigenen Spiegelbilder hinwegrollt. Nicht "umgebaut" ist dieser Hauptsatz, das "Wandeln" also nicht gehemmt. Hier zum Spaß eine Verdrehung der beiden Zeilen.
Zum Tale unaufhaltsam eilt er fort,
Was sich auch von den Gründen spiegeln mag.
Das klingt nun hübsch unsinnig! Allerdings ließen sich durchaus die eingeschobenen Nebensätze dem Quartett entwenden:
Ein Strom entrauscht umwölktem Felsensaale.
Er wandelt unaufhaltsam fort zu Tale.
Sinnlos klingt das keineswegs, doch es leiert. Nun aber erkennen wir die rhythmische Verwandtschaft der beiden Hauptsätze. Die Anordnung Hauptsatz, Nebensatz / Nebensatz, Hauptsatz ist "antithetisch" oder "chiastisch" [kreuzweise] und erzeugt ein recht kompaktes, "solides" Quartett [vierzeilige Sonettstrophe].

Und hier die Vokalfolge des ersten Quartetts (nur betonte Vokale):
o-au-ö-e-aa
o  -  ei  -  i
a -ie -  u- ü
a- u- a-o- a
Die ersten beiden Zeilen erhellen sich, die dritte verdunkelt sich und die vierte bleibt konstant.

_____


Goethe: Ätna
Dämonisch aber stürzt mit einem Male – sie ward verdreht von Goeth’schen Wirbelwinden – sich Strophe zwei, Entsetzen zu erfinden. Und hemmt den Lauf, begrenzt die weite Schale. Meinen letzten Satz versteht man nicht ohne Weiteres. Genau so jedoch ist die zweite Goethesche Strophe konstruiert:
Dämonisch aber stürzt mit einem Male –
Ihr folgen Berg und Wald in Wirbelwinden –
Sich Oreas, Behagen dort zu finden.
Und hemmt den Lauf, begrenzt die weite Schale.
Geglättet klänge diese grammatische Mutwilligkeit so: "Mit einem Male aber stürzt sich [die Bergnymphe] Oreas [hinab], um dort Behagen zu finden. Berg und Wald folgen ihr in Wirbelwinden. Und [hierdurch] hemmt sie den Lauf [des Stroms] und begrenzt [seine] weite Schale." Es würde zu weit führen, alle rhetorischen Verrenkungen dieser Strophe aufzuzählen. Das Einschneidendste ist sicherlich der Satz "Ihr folgen Berg und Wald in Wirbelwinden", der sich wie ein Bergrutsch in den bereits verrenkten Hauptsatz schiebt und zwar genau den empfindlichen Zeilensprung [Enjambement] "Mit einem Male / Sich Oreas" zerschneidend. Auch ist der eingeschobene Satz noch aufgewirbelt durch die Wortstellung –"Ihr" steht am Anfang, obwohl wir noch gar nicht wissen, auf wen sich das Pronomen überhaupt beziehen soll [Katapher] – und auch durch die vielen W-Anfangskonsonanten in "Wald in Wirbelwinden" [Alliteration].

Wie ein Bergrutsch: Die Bergnymphe Oreas wäre eine Allegorie, wenn ihr nicht so offensichtlich bereits Wald und Berg in Wirbelwinden folgten. Ein Bergrusch also. Nun, vielleicht steht ja der "Strom" für das Genie Goethes und Oreas für das störend Weibliche, oder die Herzliebe zur nur vierzig Jahre jüngeren Minna Herzlieb, an die der Zyklus ja gerichtet ist.  Oder ist der Bergsturz etwa die Sonettform selbst? "Jede Form sie kommt von oben", so heißt es im Motto des Sonettzyklus’. Darüber zu spekulieren ist aber recht müßig. Tatsächlich jedoch wurde Goethe durch den Bergsturz von Goldau, 1806, inspiriert. Er selbst bereiste mehrmals den Kanton Schwyz in der Schweiz, wanderte, dichtete und zeichnete dort.


Goldau vor der Katastrophe, 1806


Hier ist ein Echo des gewaltigen Unglücks in zeitgenössischen Berichten:

"Getöse, Krachen und Geprassel erfüllt wie tief brüllender Donner die Luft: Ganze Strecken losgerissenen Erdreichs – Felsenstücke, gross und noch grösser wie Häuser – ganze Reihen Tannenbäume werden aufrecht stehend und schwebend mit mehr als Pfeilesschnelle durch die verdickte Luft hingeschleudert." "[…] trat der Lowerzersee brüllend außer seine Grenzen, und wurde alles, was dem reißenden Steinstrom in den Weg trat, fortgeschoben oder fortgeschleudert. […] In diesem Moment erbebten Berge und Täler, zitterten Felsen, erstarrten Menschen, entfielen Vögel der Luft und schienen alle Zorngerichte Gottes über diese bisher so schöne Schöpfung gekommen zu sein."


David Alois Schmid: Goldauer Bergsturz, 1804

Nun klingt "Berg und Wald in Wirbelwinden" auf einmal gar nicht mehr nach dichterischer Übertreibung. Wie Oreas als Bergsturz den Lauf des Stroms hemmt, so stemmt sich diese impulsive, "wilde" zweite Strophe gegen das "würdige" Anfangsquartett. "Und hemmt den Lauf, begrenzt die weite Schale": nicht nur das Komma hemmt hier sondern auch das harte Aufeinanderstoßen von "t" und "d": "hemmt den", "begrenzt die". Auffällig wird das erst beim Deklamieren: Man muss hier, wenn man beide Konsonaten deutlich sprechen will, eine kleine Cäsur zwischen "t" und "d" machen.
_____

Während in dieser letzten Zeile des zweiten Quartetts ein Bindewort [Konjunktion] vor "begrenzt" eingespart ist [Asyndeton], wimmelt das erste Terzett von "unds" [Polysyndeton]:
Die Welle sprüht, und staunt zurück und weichet,
Und schwillt bergan, sich immer selbst zu trinken;
Gehemmt ist nun zum Vater hin das Streben.
Diese vielen "unds" stauen den Rhythmus – und die Welle staunt. Dramatischer wäre:
Die Welle sprüht, sie staunt zurück, sie weichet,
Sie schwillt bergan, sich immer selbst zu trinken;
Das wäre ein Agitato und ähnelte der zweiten Strophe. Die dritte aber ist gestaut. Und die Welle staunt. Sie staunt zurück. In der neunten Zeile eines Sonetts, also zu Beginn des ersten Terzetts, spürt man oft eine Wende im Ton und in der Handlung, auch "Volta" genannt. Hier nun, in diesem Sonett, kann man "Wende" durchaus wörtlich verstehen: Der Lauf des Wassers wendet sich zurück. Allerdings fließt der Strom nicht zurück zum Felsensaale sondern die Welle überschlägt sich, "trinkt sich selbst" und "schwillt bergan". Auch die Teilsätze schwellen und verlängern sich von vier Silben über sieben auf elf:
Die Welle sprüht,
und staunt zurück
und weichet,
Und schwillt bergan,
sich immer selbst zu trinken;
Gehemmt ist nun zum Vater hin das Streben.

Katsushika Hokusai: Die große Welle vor Kanagawa, 1830


Das hässliche Aufeinanderprallen der Konsonanten in "selbst zu trinken" hemmt das Sprechen. "Gehemmt ist nun zum Vater hin das Streben" (Nun ist das Streben zum Vater hin gehemmt). "Gehemmt" am Anfang der dritten Zeile stemmt sich gegen den Fluss. Auch unser Vorausdenken wird gehemmt. Wir erinnern uns nämlich zurück an das "hemmt" der zweiten Strophe zuvor. Das Erinnern trinkt sich selbst und schwillt an.
_____

Es folgt die letzte Strophe, das zweite Terzett:
Sie [die Welle] schwankt und ruht, zum See zurückgedeichet;
Gestirne, spiegelnd sich, beschaun das Blinken
Des Wellenschlags am Fels, ein neues Leben.
"Sie schwankt und ruht": Hat Conrad Ferdinand Meyer hier etwas "ausgeliehen"? Sein Römischer Brunnen endet so:
"Und jede [Schale] nimmt und gibt zugleich
Und strömt und ruht."
Indes ruht die letzte Meyersche Zeile in der Tat. Sie ist verkürzt und die zwei "fehlenden" Versfüße wird man beim Sprechen durch Dehnungen oder Pausen ersetzen und so verlangsamt sich das Tempo. Nichts ruht bei Goethe: Die Strophe schwankt in kurzen "Wellen", ohne verbindende Konjunktionen [Asyndeton]. Ich erlaube mir, sie einzufügen:
So ist die Welle nun zurückgedeichet
Und Sternlein spiegeln sich im See und blinken
Und Wellenschlag am Fels zeugt neues Leben.
Ja…, und ein sehr totes neues Leben ist’s in meiner Parodie.

Klanglich hat sich der See, bzw. die letzte Strophe, erhellt. Ihre zweite Zeile ist von I-Vokalen, die dritte von E-Vokalen gefärbt. Nicht nur Klang und Rhythmus der letzten Goetheschen Strophe haben sich in eine neue, hellere Lebendigkeit hineingeschwankt. Auch ihre Bilder erscheinen als seltsam verschobene Spiegelbilder der ersten. Die Felsen des Felsensaales sind nun in den See gefallen, oder es sind andere, kleinere, und sie sind nicht mehr umwölkt sondern von kleinen Wellen umspielt. Das Rauschen und unaufhaltsame Fortwandeln ist zurückgedeichet, und wir erhalten ein Schwanken und Ruhen stattdessen. Das Spiegeln ward nicht beachtet vom eiligen Strom, aber im See kann es mit Muße geschehen. Statt Strom und Vater Ozean beschauen wir jetzt ein neues lebendiges Wesen, den See.
____

Weit seltsamer aber noch: Das zweite Sonett des Goetheschen Zyklus’ erscheint als Verrückung des ersten. Hier ist das zweite Sonett:

              Freundliches Begegnen
Im weiten Mantel bis ans Kinn verhüllet,
Ging ich den Felsenweg, den schroffen, grauen,
Hernieder dann zu winterhaften Auen,
Unruh'gen Sinns, zur nahen Flucht gewillet.
Auf einmal schien der neue Tag enthüllet:
Ein Mädchen kam, ein Himmel anzuschauen,
So musterhaft wie jene lieben Frauen
Der Dichterwelt. Mein Sehnen war gestillet.
Doch wandt' ich mich hinweg und ließ sie gehen
Und wickelte mich enger in die Falten,
Als wollt' ich trutzend in mir selbst erwarmen;
Und folgt' ihr doch. Sie stand. Da war's geschehen!
In meiner Hülle konnt' ich mich nicht halten,
Die warf ich weg, sie lag in meinen Armen.

(Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1807)


Goethe: Scheideblick nach Italien, 1775


Wir können die merkwürdige Un- und Ähnlichkeit der beiden Sonette nicht übersehen. Bereits der Titel Freundliches Begegnen scheint Mächtiges Überraschen zu parodieren. Auch hier gibt es Felsen im ersten Quartett, allerdings nicht einen Felsensaal sondern einen Felsenweg. Nicht der Felsensaal ist umwölkt sondern Goethe, oder vielmehr "Ich", war im Mantel verhüllet. Nicht der Strom wandelt hinab sondern "Ich" ging hernieder; weder zum Ozean noch zum Tal sondern zu winterhaften Auen; nicht unaufhaltsam sondern unruh'gen Sinns, zur nahen Flucht gewillet:
[Wie] Ein Strom, entrauscht umwölktem Felsensaale,
Im weiten Mantel bis ans Kinn verhüllet,
Ging ich den Felsenweg, den schroffen, grauen,
Dem Ozean mich eilig zu verbinden,
Hernieder dann zu winterhaften Auen;
Was auch sich spiegeln mag von Grund zu Gründen,
Ich wandelt’ unaufhaltsam fort zu Tale
Unruh'gen Sinns, zur nahen Flucht gewillet.
Mit einem Male stürzt sich nicht Oreas, sondern ein Mädchen kam. Wie der Bergsturz [und "jede Form"] so kommt auch dies Mädchen offenbar von oben, denn es ist ja [wie] ein Himmel anzuschauen. Es begrenzt nicht die weite Schale sondern stillte "mein" Sehnen. Auch im Freundlichen Begegnen ist die Wende [Volta] in der neunten Zeile, aber nicht die Welle weichet sondern "Ich" wandt’ sich hinweg. Allerdings schwillt "Ich" nicht bergan, um sich selbst zu trinken sondern wickelte sich enger in die Falten. Aber auch dies ist ein In-sich-Zurückfallen: Die Welle fällt zurück in sich selbst und "Ich" in seinen eigenen Mantelschutz.

Beiden Situationen entspringt etwas Unerwartetes: Der Strom verwandelt sich in einen See und "Ich" in einen Liebhaber.

Liebe will ich liebend loben,
Jede Form, sie kommt von oben.
_____

back to Home